Alpha Chi Omega - Starting Conversations

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The Art of Flexibility

emma-brown_webBy: Emma Brown
Alpha , DePauw University

Former chapter consultant 2007-2009
Director of Community Relations at 55,000 Degrees

We’ve all heard the buzz words around 21st Century skills and the demands of employers. In today’s working world, employers are looking for more than just content knowledge or thinking skills. They’re looking for individuals who have the ability to navigate complex, global worlds. One of the skills employers look for today is adaptability, or flexibility.

Let me tell you this, there is no better way to learn adaptability than being a chapter consultant. As a consultant, flexibility starts with managing delayed or canceled flights and an evolving schedule of travel. In my two years as a chapter consultant, I was on a plane every three or four days of the semester which leads to a lot of delayed flights. Sometimes, your only option is to be patient but other times you have to work with your airline to get to your recruitment visit on time (recruitment doesn’t stop for delayed flights!). In these moments, you’re learning to deal with adversity and navigate complex systems – a valuable skill in your future career.

When not in the air, you’re spending your time talking with chapter members and officers, getting to know them and the culture of their chapter. This often means learning new customs of each chapter and finding the commonality that makes us all Alpha Chi Omegas. While talking about planning sisterhood events doesn’t always translate in an interview, as a consultant, you’ll be able to talk about understanding and balancing diverse views to reach workable solutions (aka any CRSB meeting). You’ll have real world experiences of effectively working in an ambiguous setting while adapting to new job responsibilities, priorities and schedules.

When I finished being a chapter consultant, I knew I wasn’t going into higher education and I was a little nervous about how to translate that experience to other industries. I’ve now worked with nonprofit organizations for ten years and I still talk about my time as a consultant. I love sharing the story of visiting the University of Vermont on a Monday and the University of Arizona on a Thursday – talk about flexibility and adaptability!

Being a consultant shaped my professional career in ways I never imagined, all while providing me amazing experiences to travel the country and meet my sisters in their homes.

If you’re thinking about being a consultant but not sure, you can contact me – I’d be happy to talk about my experience and what it meant to me!

Don’t miss the opportunity to start your application to become a chapter consultant today!

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